Martial Arts Ann Arbor - Jujutsu | Jujitsu | Jiu-Jitsu

Commonly Asked Question on Self-Defense

Is Judo effective when it comes to self-defense?

Yes!

But first you have to get good at it. Judo means "gentle way", not because it is an easy martial art, but because everyone can partake and benefit from training. Judo focuses on using efficiency and technique in overcoming an opponent, rather than brute strength.

Judo was first established as an effective martial art when judoka dominated other reputable martial art styles in a Tokyo Metropolitan Police Academy tournament. From hybrid martial arts to street fighting, Judo holds its reputation as an effective martial arts style.




Standing choke demonstration in Nihon Jujutsu
Is Nihon Jujutsu effective when it comes to self-defense?

Yes!

But first you have to get good at it. Nihon Jujutsu is a system of self-defense techniques that uses modern and historical Japanese martial arts.

Nihon Jujutsu was forged from the most effective self-defense Japanese martial arts of its time: Judo, Karate, Aikido, and Taihojutsu (Japanese police immobilization and arresting techniques). "The founder of Nihon Jujutsu, Sato Shizuya, established this system based on his extensive studies with leading Japanese budoka (traditional martial artists), many of whom introduced ancient bujutsu methods into modern budo" (Source).


For more information on self-defense, Ann Arbor local Japanese Martial Arts Center has answers!

Badass Chokeholds | Intersections Between Judo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (Ann Arbor)

Judo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu share an arsenal of effective, deadly chokehold techniques. These dominating submissions are popular in the military, MMA, and self-defense. The beauty of the chokehold is that it requires minimal amounts of force and provides leverage against bigger opponents.

The similarities between the Judo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu chokeholds are no coincidence. At the turn of the twentieth century, a group of second generation, Kodokan judoka toured Brazil. Their show was erroneously marketed as "Kano Jiu Jitsu", but was actually a dazzling display of Jigoro Kano's best Judo techniques against South American fighters. Mitsuyo Maeda, one of the best ground fighters from Kano's school, influenced Hélio Gracie. Hélio went on to found Gracie Jiu Jitsu, a groundwork and submission centric adaptation of Judo.

The nine chokeholds are some of the most popular submissions from Judo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu repertoire. For more information, check out our article.

Unless executed under proper instruction, please do not attempt these chokeholds on your own! For more information on Judo or Jiu Jitsu, Ann Arbor Japanese Martial Arts Center is happy to answer your questions!

The Crucible

A substance, having undergone the intense heat and pressure of a crucible, emerges as a completely different substance.

A person, having undergone the intense reflection and training of a crucible, emerges as a completely different person.

More focused.
More efficient.
Mentally stronger.
More physically capable.
More effective.
12 hours of deep work on your mind, body and spirit.

“I agree to attend!”
“I agree to stay for the entire 12 hours!”
“I agree to judge on results!”
“I agree to participate fully!”
“I agree to support other participants!”
“I agree to take a giant step up!”

What:   The Crucible
When:  Saturday, November 21, 2015
            6am – 6pm
Where: Japanese Martial Arts Center

Ages 16 & Up Only.

Comprehensive waiver and participation agreement required.
I have only one question ... why are you afraid?

Choke Series: Hell Strangle | Jigoku-jime

The attacker locks the opponent's arms before opening the lapel (top left). The attacker feeds the opponent's lapel to the hand that will execute the choke (top right). This close-up shows the forearm pressed like a blade against the opponent's carotid (bottom left). The choke is applied when pressure is put against the artery (bottom right).
For more information on this insane choke, check out our page on the Hell Strangle.

Choke Series: Front Lapel Stranglehold | Kata-juji-jime

In this set, the attacker has pulled the opponent into his guard. He shows the position of the hands for demonstration purposes (top left). This image shows how far his hands have to sink into the opponent's collar and that palms face opposite ways (top right). The choke is situated (bottom left). The choke is applied when the elbows move away from the opponent and the forearms garret the neck (bottom right). For extra leverage, the attacker should breathe in and expand his torso.
For tips on executing this choke, check out our page on kata-juji-jime.

Choke Series: Reverse Cross Lock | Gyaku-juji-jime

In this set, the attacker has pulled the opponent into his guard. He shows the position of the hands for demonstration purposes (top left). This image shows how far his hands have to sink into the opponent's collar and that both thumbs are up (top right). The choke is situated (bottom left). The choke is applied when the elbows move away from the opponent and the forearms garret the neck (bottom right). For extra leverage, the attacker should breathe in and expand his torso.   

For more information on Gyaku-juji-jime, check out our link here.

Interview with Highest Ranking Jujutsu Martial Artist | Trends Between European and Japanese Martial Arts



John B. Gage Sensei




















[The following is an excerpt from the interview found here: Interview]

The Japanese Martial Arts Center did an interview with John Gage Sensei, head of the Nihon Jujutsu system, on his upcoming trip to Copenhagen, Denmark. Gage Sensei is teaching at a seminar from October 16-18, 2015 through the International Martial Arts Federation [IMAF].


What are trending differences between European and Japanese martial arts?

The differences are pronounced. Jujutsu has become an eclectic term outside of Japan that generally encompasses two schools of thought; one being Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and the other being a self-defense oriented training system.

While Brazilian Jiu Jitsu has become internationally popular in recent years, Jujutsu in Europe has been widely practiced in various countries since the late 1960's - early 70's. The majority of European Jujutsu styles comprise basic techniques taken from Aikido, Karate, and Judo, and focus on striking, as well as definitive means of disabling an assailant i.e. they are primarily methods of self-defense.

The Japanese concept of modern jujutsu, and by modern we mean the Meiji Era (1868 - 1912), focuses primarily on maintaining control over an opponent with minimal harm. Nihon Jujutsu, in particular, has its basis in the basics of Judo, Taiho-jutsu, restraining techniques used primarily by the Japanese police, and early teachings of Tomiki Kenji (1900 - 1979). It focuses on throwing as a means of self-defense, immobilizing, joint control, evasive stepping, and control with minimal harm as appropriate to the situation.

Methods of control, primarily used by Nihon Jujutsu, focus on off balance (kuzushi), in order to set up a technique with minimal resistance, as well as striking to control the opponent or creating an opening to apply a technique rather than inflicting catastrophic damage. The footwork is characterized by maintaining a natural standing position (shizentai), in order to maximize mobility. This flexibility allows one to respond in the strategically most advantageous manner.

For more information on Nihon Jujutsu (sometimes spelled 'jiu jitsu'), Ann Arbor-located Japanese Martial Arts Center has a page on the differences between Nihon Jujutsu and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

Gage Sensei Internation Seminar (General Announcement)

This event involves three days of training with international martial arts masters in Copenhagen, Denmark! Gage Sensei, head of the Nihon Jujutsu system, will be sharing his expertise with people from around the world. For more information on the seminar, visit:

http://imaf.dk/index.php/en/seminars/european-seminar-2015







Choke Series: Single Wing Choke | Kata-ha-jime

The hand under the arm opens the lapel and feeds it to the other hand [top left]. The opposite hand sinks into the collar, thumbs in, with the forearm against the neck [top right]. The hand under the arm slides behind the neck until the fingers can touch the opposite arm's bicep [bottom left]. The wrist across the neck levers against the opponent's check [bottom right]. 
For more information on this classic choke, check out our Single Wing Choke page.

Choke Series: Triangle Choke | Sankaku-jime


A brief breakdown of the choke:
    ⁃    One of the opponent's arms and his/her neck is between your legs.
    ⁃    Drag the opponent's arm across your body and bite down on the neck with your leg. This gives you control over your opponent's posture!
    ⁃    Make sure that the opponent's head is down.
    ⁃    Cross your ankle under the opposite knee.
    ⁃    Your legs should create a garrote around his/her carotids.


For more information, visit our Sankaku-jime page.

Test Date Reminder


Choke Series: Front Arm Triangle | Mae-hadaka-jime


The bottom arm is fitted under the neck, so that the carotids are pinioned between the bicep and the forearm (top left). The free arm acts as a fulcrum, as the fingers on the opposite hand slide down the bicep (top right). The choke is applied (bottom left). An alternate view of the opponent's head (bottom right).

Want a more detailed explanation? Check out our page: Mae-hadaka-jime.

Choke Series: Rear Naked Choke | Hadaka Jime

The choke is set up in the traditional way (top left). The choke is applied, creating a garrote around the neck at the carotids (top right). In the second version, the fingers of the free hand more towards the bicep (bottom left). The hand tucks behind the neck, completing the choke (bottom right).


For more information on this killer submission, visit our page on Hadaka-jime.

Tameshigiri


On July 18, starting at 1:00pm, the Iaido members are invited to cut tatami mats. Last year had an excellent turn-out. We look forward to seeing you again!

May and June News!

It has been a busy past two months. Here are some of the highlights:

Gage Sensei and His Family at JMAC!

After spending nearly 28 years training in the Greater Tokyo area, the head of the Nihon Jujutsu system, John Gage Sensei, has moved to Ann Arbor, MI. It is a privilege to have the most accomplished living representative of the late Sato Shizuya Sensei teach and train at the Japanese Martial Arts center. The Ann Arbor martial arts community is honored!

The Lotus Blossom Fundraiser

The Japanese Martial Arts Center did an excellent job raising funds for the Nepal Earthquake Relief. Almost $2000 were raised between the Dexter Rotary Club and JMAC.

Kids Karate Promotions

On June 6, the Kids Karate class had a belt promotion. Congratulations to promoted candidates!

9th Anniversary

On June 20, the Japanese Martial Arts Center will celebrate its 9th Anniversary! It will be a potluck-style event, complete with a bouncy house and games. This is a family-friendly event and certain to be the talk of the year!

In the morning, there will be a special Gage Sensei Seminar. This is open to JMAC members exclusively.

Upcoming 2015 Summer Events!

Get ready for a ROCKING summer!

  • May 9, Saturday @ 3pm - Nueve de Mayo
     This killer workout is made to celebrate the number 9! All JMACers are welcome! (Parents and families who want a killer workout are welcome, too!)
  • May 22-25, Friday-Monday - Memorial Day WeekendJMAC is closed!
  • May 31, Sunday - Dexter - Ann Arbor RunSuino-Sensei is signed up for the 10K! For more information, check out this information on the run. 
  • June 6-7, Saturday-Sunday - JMAC is open!Suino-Sensei is teaching iaido in Kitchener, Ontario. JMACers are welcome to join!
  • June 20, Saturday - The Japanese Martial Arts Center's 9th Anniversary!
    • Special Workout from 9:30am-noonMore details to follow...
    • Potluck Celebration from 5:00-7:30pmSocializing, bounce house, and bragging rights on the best dish for the rest of the year! More details to follow...
  • July 3-6, Friday-Monday - Independence Day WeekendJMAC is closed!
  • August 23, Sunday - Subaru Down and Dirty Mud RunSign up with the JMAC team! Contact Sensei for more details.
  • September 26, Saturday - Tough Mudder
    Sign up with the JMAC team! Contact Sensei for more details. 

For more information on our Ann Arbor Jiu Jitsu, Judo, Iaido, or Karate programs, contact info@japanesemartialartscenter.com. 

Ann Arbor Karate Words You Want to Know


Ann Arbor Karateka Warming Up
Karate
空手 means "empty hand". It was invented in Okinawa, formerly the Ryukyu Islands, under the influence of Chinese martial arts. It was brought to the Japanese mainland with the intent of creating a systematic combat style. Karate focuses on strikes, such as punching and kicking.

Karateka
空手家 means "a practitioner of karate". If you are a karate student, you are a karateka!

Kihon
基本 means "fundamentals". These basic moves serve as a foundation for the martial art. Examples include stances, blocks, strikes, kicks, and meditation. Mastering the basics indicates a readiness to participate in complex kata and sparring. This is similar to working on scales and rhythm patterns in music before playing in a symphony.



For the complete list, visit here.

An Interview with Warrington Hudlin [Excerpt]


Warrington HudlinWarrington Hudlin has made an indelible name for himself in the film industry and media. In 1978, four years after graduating from Yale, he founded the Black Filmmaker Foundation. He is the producer of films, such as Boomerang (1992), House Party (1990), and Cosmic Slop (1994). His accolades include the Trailblazer Award from the Hip Hop Association, a 2005 Webby Award for best political website, and the Pioneer Award from African American Women in Cinema. He is currently a member of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences and other councils. He serves on advisory boards such as Asian Cinevision and the Coalition of Asian Pacific Entertainment (CAPE). He also curates a monthly series at the Museum of Moving Images called Fist and Sword.

As a major name in the film industry for the past three decades, how have you seen the roles of African Americans evolve in the film industry, specifically in martial art films?

Michelle Yeoh
Michelle Yeoh in "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"
Well one thing that really struck me is that there has always been an intersection of interest between martial arts movies coming from Asia and audiences of African descent. In film marketing departments, the dollars that made these movies possible came from the pockets of Blacks and Latinos.

Actually, I had a wonderful conversation once with Michelle Yeoh. I told her that people knew her. This was her first time visiting New York, and she thought that there was no awareness of who she was. And I said, "No, no, no. In fact, we could get on subways right now and we could walk to Times Square, where people may not know you. But if you came to Harlem, people would definitely know you." She was really surprised that this community recognized that these movies came out of Hong Kong first. To this day, there's a tremendous affinity to these actors and films in the community.


Now, you've interacted with amazing people, like yourself, from Eddie Murphy to Michael White. Who has been the most inspirational person you've worked with?

There are different inspirations from different people.

Harry Belafonte isn't someone I've worked with in front of the camera, but he is an elder. He has really advised me in my goals as a filmmaker who is concerned with social justice. Anyone who's seen the movie Selma can understand the role he played during the civil rights struggle.

He's 87 years old, and he's done it. He's an African American who has successfully negotiated in the film industry and maintained his integrity.

Everyone gives you something. So, if you are attentive to subtleties, everything comes in ways that enrich you.


What have been some of your favorite accomplishments for BFF?

When Spike Lee was a student, we were helpful to him. We supported his efforts. So if you ask anyone in the business, they would tell you that the first institution to organize and create a facility for them to grow and prosper… they would say that we were that organization.
 

 To read the entire interview, check out this link.

What's the Difference Between Nihon Jujutsu and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu? (Part 2)

Ann Arbor Jiu Jitsu
Master Carlos Gracie and Master Helio Gracie sparring.

History 

(The rest of the article can be found here.)

Jûjutsu, which generally refers to systems of unarmed combative techniques, may be said to be one of the oldest branches of Japanese martial arts. Images of fighters using jûjutsu techniques can be found in a variety of early historical records.

Nihon Jujutsu is a modern Japanese martial art that focuses on practical, efficient techniques as originally found in both ancient and contemporary martial arts. Its principles and techniques derive from Japanese unarmed combat and self-defense techniques from pre-1945 judo and aiki-bujutsu, as well as taihojutsu (Japanese police immobilization and arresting methods). The founder of Nihon Jujutsu, Sato Shizuya, established this system based on his extensive studies with leading Japanese budoka (traditional martial artists), many of whom introduced ancient bujutsu methods into modern budo.

Despite its name, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu was originally based on the techniques of Kodokan Judo, a system created by Kano Jigoro. A student of Kano Sensei, Esai Maeda, later known as Conde Koma, visited Brazil, and his instruction formed the basis of today’s Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

At the Japanese Martial Arts Center, the Nihon Jujutsu style is taught. Nicklaus Suino Sensei is a direct student of Sato Shizuya Sensei, the fouder of Nihon Jujutus. For more information, contact info@japanesemartialartscenter.com.

What's the Difference Between Nihon Jujutsu and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu? (Part 1)

Spelling
(The rest of the article can be found at here.)

Ann Arbor Jujutsu
The founder of Nihon Jujutsu, Shizuya Sato Sensei.
The translation of Nihon Jujutsu breaks down in the following ways:
1. "Nihon" means "Japanese"
2. "Ju" means "gentle, soft, supple, flexible, pliable or yielding"
3. "Jutsu" means "art or technique"


However, given the variations of spelling and usage of terms related to ‘jûjutsu,’ as well as the confusion that arises as a result, it’s probably helpful to look at the origins of the term as it’s written in Japanese and English.

Jyûjutsu (noun) as written in Japanese can be translated as the ‘technique(s) of flexibility, softness et al’, and denotes a system of techniques including striking, throwing and joint manipulation as a means of combat or self-defense.

Jitsu (noun or adj.) as written in Japanese can be translated as truth; reality; sincerity; honesty; fidelity; content; substance; (good) result.

So you could argue that jyû-jitsu, or Jiu-Jitsu, is a spelling error – similar to the incorrect use of a homophone in English like there, they’re, or their – which later became established as "Brazilian jiu-jitsu" or "Gracie Jiu-Jitsu" to differentiate the styles. When referring to the Brazilian counterpart, it is common to use the spelling "Jiu-Jitsu." Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is also often referred to as "jitz" or "BJJ".

At the Japanese Martial Arts Center, the Nihon Jujutsu style is taught. Nicklaus Suino Sensei is a direct student of Sato Shizuya Sensei, the founder of Nihon Jujutsu. For more information, email info@japanesemartialartscenter.com.