Martial Arts Ann Arbor - Jujutsu | Jujitsu | Jiu-Jitsu

What's the Difference Between Nihon Jujutsu and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu? (Part 2)

Ann Arbor Jiu Jitsu
Master Carlos Gracie and Master Helio Gracie sparring.

History 

(The rest of the article can be found here.)

Jûjutsu, which generally refers to systems of unarmed combative techniques, may be said to be one of the oldest branches of Japanese martial arts. Images of fighters using jûjutsu techniques can be found in a variety of early historical records.

Nihon Jujutsu is a modern Japanese martial art that focuses on practical, efficient techniques as originally found in both ancient and contemporary martial arts. Its principles and techniques derive from Japanese unarmed combat and self-defense techniques from pre-1945 judo and aiki-bujutsu, as well as taihojutsu (Japanese police immobilization and arresting methods). The founder of Nihon Jujutsu, Sato Shizuya, established this system based on his extensive studies with leading Japanese budoka (traditional martial artists), many of whom introduced ancient bujutsu methods into modern budo.

Despite its name, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu was originally based on the techniques of Kodokan Judo, a system created by Kano Jigoro. A student of Kano Sensei, Esai Maeda, later known as Conde Koma, visited Brazil, and his instruction formed the basis of today’s Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

At the Japanese Martial Arts Center, the Nihon Jujutsu style is taught. Nicklaus Suino Sensei is a direct student of Sato Shizuya Sensei, the fouder of Nihon Jujutus. For more information, contact info@japanesemartialartscenter.com.

What's the Difference Between Nihon Jujutsu and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu? (Part 1)

Spelling
(The rest of the article can be found at here.)

Ann Arbor Jujutsu
The founder of Nihon Jujutsu, Shizuya Sato Sensei.
The translation of Nihon Jujutsu breaks down in the following ways:
1. "Nihon" means "Japanese"
2. "Ju" means "gentle, soft, supple, flexible, pliable or yielding"
3. "Jutsu" means "art or technique"


However, given the variations of spelling and usage of terms related to ‘jûjutsu,’ as well as the confusion that arises as a result, it’s probably helpful to look at the origins of the term as it’s written in Japanese and English.

Jyûjutsu (noun) as written in Japanese can be translated as the ‘technique(s) of flexibility, softness et al’, and denotes a system of techniques including striking, throwing and joint manipulation as a means of combat or self-defense.

Jitsu (noun or adj.) as written in Japanese can be translated as truth; reality; sincerity; honesty; fidelity; content; substance; (good) result.

So you could argue that jyû-jitsu, or Jiu-Jitsu, is a spelling error – similar to the incorrect use of a homophone in English like there, they’re, or their – which later became established as "Brazilian jiu-jitsu" or "Gracie Jiu-Jitsu" to differentiate the styles. When referring to the Brazilian counterpart, it is common to use the spelling "Jiu-Jitsu." Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is also often referred to as "jitz" or "BJJ".

At the Japanese Martial Arts Center, the Nihon Jujutsu style is taught. Nicklaus Suino Sensei is a direct student of Sato Shizuya Sensei, the founder of Nihon Jujutsu. For more information, email info@japanesemartialartscenter.com.